content-left-bg.png
content-right-bg.png

Humanities

WebPartZone1_1
PublishingPageContent

Senior secondary

Year 11 and 12 Ancient History

The course is theme based, and within each theme are inquiry (in-depth) and bridging studies. Students not only examine traditional ancient civilisations such as Egypt, Greece and Rome, but also recent developments in world archaeology. Opportunities to follow personal interests are provided by undertaking independent research tasks.

Across 4 Semesters, there are six areas of study:

  • Archaeological and reconstructive techniques
  • The power of the pharaoh in Ancient Egypt
  • Everyday life in Ancient Greece and Rome
  • A Study of Political Centrism in Rome
  • Studies of Personalities in History
  • Studies in the Influence of Groups in Ancient Societies or Studies of Religion.

Year 11 and 12 Legal Studies

In Legal Studies, students develop an understanding of the ways in which the legal system can affect the lives of Australian citizens. Students will examine the frameworks which regulate and shape our society. By analysing Australian and international legal systems, students consider the impacts that legal decisions can have on Australian society and how diverse groups influence and are influenced by the legal system.

Through inquiry, analysis, examination and evaluation, students can make decisions which may benefit themselves and the community now and in the future. The immediate relevance of Legal Studies will motivate students to make constructive judgments and informed commentaries on the law, its system and processes.

Students will study the following units throughout the two year course:

  • The Legal System
  • Crime and Society
  • Introduction to Civil Obligations
  • Civil Wrongs and the Law
  • Technology and the Law
  • Family Law
  • Independent Inquiry
  • Human Rights
  • International Law.

Year 11 and 12 Tourism

This course aims to ensure students are able to understand the scope and changing nature of the tourist industry. Students will see how the various facets of the tourist industry are organised, managed and controlled as well as study the impact of tourism on our environment, economy, culture and society.

In particular, students will study:

  • The Nature of Tourism
  • Grooming and deportment
  • Tourism in the Local Area
  • Impact of Tourism. Sustainability
  • Global Destinations and Attractions
  • Tour Guiding
  • Tourism and the Developing World
  • Travel on a Budget
  • Careers. Domestic and International
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Customer Relations
  • Computers and Tourism
  • Tourism and Natural Environment
  • Operating and Marketing a Tourism Business.

An important part of this course involves field excursions and the very popular program, inside out, where students experience work within international hotels.

Year 11 Social and Community Studies

This course centres on the skills students need to function efficiently and positively in current and future life roles. These roles focus on:

  • Personal management
  • Management of relationships
  • Resources management
  • Community involvement.

The four life roles and their associated life skills provide a framework for a course of study in Social and Community Studies. Life skills include the following:

  • Personal skills
  • Social skills
  • Self-management skills
  • Citizenship skills.

Year 11 Modern History

Through the study of history, we can understand why our modern world is the way it is. Students can understand the processes of change and continuity that have shaped today’s world, their causes, and the roles people have played in those processes. They can understand that there are relationships between our needs and interests and a range of historical issues, people and events. Students will develop these understandings through processes of critical inquiry, research, debate and reflection, and through empathetic engagement with the standpoint of others. The research skills developed in Modern History provide invaluable preparation for further higher level academic studies.

There are four (4) areas of study:

  • Studies of Conflict
  • History of Ideas and Beliefs
  • National Histories
  • Studies of Power.

Year 10 History

The Modern World and Australia

The Year 10 curriculum provides a study of the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context. The twentieth century became a critical period in Australia’s social, cultural, economic and political development. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia’s development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region, and its global standing.

The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts may be investigated within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding of the past and to provide a focus for historical inquiries.

The history content at this year level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions at this year level are:

  • How did the nature of global conflict change during the twentieth century?
  • What were the consequences of World War II? How did these consequences shape the modern world?
  • How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in this period?

Shailer Park will provide students with the opportunity to explore this Historical period through depth studies over the Semester. Investigations will be chosen from:

  • WW2
  • Rights and Freedoms
  • Globalising the World.

Junior secondary

Year 7-8 History/ Geography

Semester 1 - History - The ancient to the modern world

The Year 7-8 curriculum provides study of history from the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern period, c.650 AD (CE) – 1750. This was when major civilizations around the world came into contact with each other. Social, economic, religious, and political beliefs were often challenged and significantly changed. It was the period when the modern world began to take shape.

The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts may be investigated within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding of the past and to provide a focus for historical inquiries.

The history content at this year level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated way; and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions at this year level are:

  • How did societies change from the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern age?
  • What key beliefs and values emerged and how did they influence societies?
  • What were the causes and effects of contact between societies in this period?
  • Which significant people, groups and ideas from this period have influenced the world today?

Shailer Park will provide students with the opportunity to explore this Historical period through depth studies over the Semester. Investigations will be chosen from Medieval Europe, Japan under the Shoguns and the Spanish Conquest of the Americas.

Semester 2 – Geography

There are two units of study in the Year 7-8 curriculum for Geography: Landforms and landscapes and Changing nations.

Landforms and landscapes focuses on investigating geomorphology through a study of landscapes and their landforms. This unit examines the processes that shape individual landforms, the values and meanings placed on landforms and landscapes by diverse cultures, hazards associated with landscapes, and management of landscapes. Landforms and landscapes develop students’ understanding of the concept of environment and enables them to explore the significance of landscapes to people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. These distinctive aspects of landforms and landscapes are investigated using studies drawn from Australia and throughout the world.

Changing nations investigates the changing human geography of countries, as revealed by shifts in population distribution. The spatial distribution of population is a sensitive indicator of economic and social change, and has significant environmental, economic and social effects, both negative and positive. The unit explores the process of urbanisation and draws on a study of a country of the Asia region to show how changes the economies and societies of low and middle-income countries. It investigates the reasons for the high level of urban concentration in Australia, one of the distinctive features of Australia’s human geography, and compares Australia with the United States of America. The redistribution of population resulting from internal migration is examined through case studies of Australia and China, and is contrasted with the way international migration reinforces urban concentration in Australia. The unit then examines issues related to the management and future of Australia’s urban areas.

The content of this year level is organised into two strands: Geographical Knowledge and Understanding and Geographical Inquiry and Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated manner, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

Key inquiry questions;

A framework for developing students’ geographical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided through the inclusion of inquiry questions and specific inquiry skills, including the use and interpretation of maps, photographs and other representations of geographical data.

The key inquiry questions for Year 8 are articulated below.

  • How do environmental and human processes affect the characteristics of places and environments?
  • How do the interconnections between places, people and environments affect the lives of people?
  • What are the consequences of changes to places and environments and how can these changes be managed?

Year 9 History - The making of the modern world

The Year 9 curriculum provides a study of the history of the making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918. It was a period of industrialisation and rapid change in the ways people lived, worked and thought. It was an era of nationalism and imperialism, and the colonisation of Australia was part of the expansion of European power. The period culminated in World War I 1914-1918, the ‘war to end all wars’.

The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts may be investigated within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding of the past and to provide a focus for historical inquiries.

The history content at this year level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated way; and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions at this year level are:

Key inquiry questions

  • What were the changing features of the movements of people from 1750 to 1918?
  • How did new ideas and technological developments contribute to change in this period?
  • What was the origin, development, significance and long-term impact of imperialism in this period?
  • What was the significance of World War I?

Shailer Park will provide students with the opportunity to explore this Historical period through depth studies over the Semester. Investigations will be chosen from

  • Movement of Peoples
  • Making a Nation
  • WW1.

Year 9 Geography

There are two units of study in the Year 9 curriculum for Geography: Biomes and food security and Geographies of interconnections.

Biomes and food security focuses on investigating the role of the biotic environment and its role in food and fibre production. This unit examines the biomes of the world, their alteration and significance as a source of food and fibre, and the environmental challenges and constraints on expanding food production in the future. These distinctive aspects of biomes, food production and food security are investigated using studies drawn from Australia and across the world.

Geographies of interconnections focuses on investigating how people, through their choices and actions, are connected to places throughout the world in a wide variety of ways, and how these connections help to make and change places and their environments. This unit examines the interconnections between people and places through the products people buy and the effects of their production on the places that make them. Students examine the ways that transport and information and communication technologies have made it possible for an increasing range of services to be provided internationally, and for people in isolated rural areas to connect to information, services and people in other places. These distinctive aspects of interconnection are investigated using studies drawn from Australia and across the world.

The content of this year level is organised into two strands: Geographical Knowledge and Understanding and Geographical Inquiry and Skills. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated manner, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts.

Key inquiry questions

A framework for developing students’ geographical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided through the inclusion of inquiry questions and specific inquiry skills, including the use and interpretation of maps, photographs and other representations of geographical data.

The key inquiry questions for Year 9 are articulated below:

  • What are the causes and consequences of change in places and environments and how can this change be managed?
  • What are the future implications of changes to places and environments?
  • Why are interconnections and interdependencies important for the future of places and environments?

By the end of Year 9, students explain how geographical processes change the characteristics of places. They predict changes in the characteristics of places over time and identify the possible implications of change for the future. They analyse interconnections between people, places and environments and explain how these interconnections influence people, and change places and environments. Students propose explanations for distributions and patterns over time and across space and describe associations between distribution patterns. They analyse alternative strategies to a geographical challenge using environmental, social and economic criteria and propose and justify a response.

Students use initial research to identify geographically significant questions to frame an inquiry. They collect and evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources and select relevant geographical data and information to answer inquiry questions. They represent multi-variable data in a range of appropriate graphic forms, including special purpose maps that comply with cartographic conventions. They analyse data to propose explanations for patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies and to predict outcomes. Students synthesise data and information to draw reasoned conclusions. They present findings and explanations using relevant geographical terminology and graphic representations in a range of appropriate communication forms. Students propose action in response to a geographical challenge taking account of environmental, economic and social considerations and predict the outcomes and consequences of their proposal.

Social and community studies

This course centres on the skills students need to function efficiently, effectively and positively in current and future life roles, in order to interact in a variety of social, cultural, economic and environmental contexts. These roles focus on:

  • Personal development
  • Social skills
  • Self-reliance &Self-management
  • Resources management
  • Community participation
  • Workplace participation skills.

The four life roles and their associated life skills provide a framework for a course of study, emphasising:

  • Personal skills
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Citizenship skills
  • Workplace attributes.
WebPartZone1_2
WebPartZone2_1
WebPartZone2_2
WebPartZone2_3
WebPartZone3_1
WebPartZone3_2
WebPartZone3_3
WebPartZone3_4
WebPartZone4_1
WebPartZone5_1
WebPartZone5_2
WebPartZone6_1
WebPartZone6_2
WebPartZone7_1
WebPartZone7_2
WebPartZone8_1
WebPartZone8_2
WebPartZone9_1
Last reviewed 07 January 2019
Last updated 07 January 2019